richard green Ken Howard

Henry Moore (Castleford, Yorkshire 1898 - Much Hadham, England 1986)

  • Henry Moore - Standing Figures, 1940
    Henry Moore Standing Figures, 1940 Signed and dated, lower left: Moore / 40
    Mixed media on card
    11 x 15 in
    27.9 x 38.1 cm
    Full details

    BS 162

     

    HENRY MOORE

     Castleford 1898 - 1986 Much Hadham

     

    Standing Figures, 1940

     

    Signed and dated, lower left: Moore / 40

    Chalk, crayon, watercolour wash, pen and ink on card: 11 x 15 in / 27.9 x 38.1 cm

     

    Recorded in the Henry Moore Foundation archives as HMF 1511

     

    Provenance:

    Private Collection, UK

     

    Literature:

    Ann Garrould (ed.), Henry Moore, Complete Drawings, 1940-1949, Vol. III, Lund Humphries, London, 2001, p. 31, no. AG 40.38 (HMF 1511)

    Kenneth Clark, Henry Moore, Drawings, Harper & Row, London, 1974, p. 135, pl. 120

     

     

    In November 1939, Kenneth Clark, the Director of the National Gallery, London, was appointed the Chairman of the War Artists’ Advisory Committee and it was Clark who was able to persuade a very reluctant Henry Moore to become an official War Artist. During this time the walls of the National Gallery had been stripped bare and its treasures had been removed and transported to Wales. They safely remained in Bangor and several other locations in Wales for the duration of the war. The National Gallery remained open to the public - despite it being bombed several times during the Blitz - and would hold free lunchtime concerts everyday where musicians, such as the distinguished pianist Myra Hess, would play. These concerts would draw in huge crowds and many would stay after to view the work of the war artists that now hung on the walls. It was thanks to Clark’s persistence that Moore became a War Artist and began to receive wider exposure for his work, his recognition from the public was instantaneous – “People could relate to them because they were drawings of themselves” (Henry Moore).[1]

     

    The grouped and hollowed figures in Drawing of standing figures, 1940 have large, bulking forms that appear alien and unfamiliar in comparison to our own. In the conception of these hollow figures, ‘Moore seems to have created a credible alternative to the human race, as if millions of years ago, evolution had taken a different course…That the internal-external figures are, to some extent, inspired by hollow trees, is clear enough in the early drawings of the motif, where the edge of the aperture has the gratifying bluntness of wood.’[2] Drawing of standing figures, 1940 is a drawing executed in the early stages of Moore developing this motif. Here the standing forms show the apertures and caves normally found in the form of trees and Moore transposes them onto the shape of a human body. As he continued to develop this motif through his drawing, the exterior of the forms gradually changed from wooden to metallic in texture and came to possess a harsher surface. Here the ‘mechanism of the interior becomes more assertive’ (Kenneth Clark). Moore then went on to his drawings to further experiment with this motif - the ‘internal-external figure’ - in sculptural relief. Drawing of standing figures, 1940 is not a preparatory study for sculpture but a fully realised work of art in which Moore has created form through a colourful use of mixed technique. Though not preparatory it does mirror the exploration of forms in space that later preoccupied Moore in his sculpture works.  

     

    Potentially reflective of the period in which it was created, this drawing harbours a sensation of alienation. The figures themselves have strange and unknown forms and though grouped they stand alone, detached from one another. In 1940 Moore began his Shelter Drawings. After the Blitz started (7th September 1940) many Londoners would seek refuge in the tunnels of the Underground and Moore became drawn to the tragedy of the city’s situation. Though none of the drawings, as in Drawing of standing figures, 1940, were specific in their location or aiming to capture particular people, they embodied the fear and isolation that was inescapable. This looming tension is evident in the unidentifiable bulking forms that command the pictorial space of this drawing; they seem tense and as though caught in a moment of nervous apprehension. The anxious nature of the repetitive markings made through the overlapping layers of pen, crayon and chalk, opposes the naturally calming nature of the wood. Moore himself spoke of how art and nature often coincide in their randomness and of how most of what occurs in both is accidental.  

     

    “Art tends to arrive as a true result through instinct … Besides the human form, I am tremendously excited by all natural forms, such as cloud formations, birds, trees and their roots.” (Henry Moore)

     

    In 1940 Moore’s studio in Hampstead was significantly damaged by bombing and the artist left London for the village of Perry Green near Much Hadham in Hertfordshire. Within a few months Moore and his wife Irina were renting an old farmhouse called Hoglands. Hoglands would come to be their family home and remained so for the rest of their lives.

     

    Henry Moore, Standing Figures, 1940

    Wax, coloured pencil, ink and watercolour on paper support: 26.4 x 18.1 cm

    Tate Collection [N05210]

     

     


    HENRY MOORE OM, CH

    Castleford, Yorkshire 1898 - 1986 Much Hadham, Herts

     

     

    The seventh child of Raymond Spencer and Mary Moore, Henry was born in Castleford, Yorkshire in 1898. His paternal great-grandfather was of Irish origin, but his father and grandfather were born in Yorkshire where, for two or three generations, they worked the land or went down the mines. At the age of twelve Moore obtained a grant to study at the Grammar School in Castleford where he was inspired by his art teacher to pursue a career in the arts. In 1916 he began to teach, but by February 1917 he had joined the army and left to fight in France.

     

    After being wounded in action in November 1917 at the battle of Cambrai, Moore was excused from active service. He returned to England, where he became a physical education instructor in the army. At the end of the war, Moore received a veteran’s grant to study at Leeds School of Art and in 1921 he joined a course at the Royal College of Art in London. A further grant enabled him to travel extensively from 1925, visiting Rome, Florence, Venice, Ravenna and Paris, where he met Picasso, Giacometti, Ernst, Eluard and Breton among others.

     

    On returning from his travels Moore was appointed Professor of Sculpture at the Royal College of Art where he worked two days a week until 1931, as well as teaching at the Chelsea School of Art until 1939. He was appointed an Official War Artist during the Second World War from 1940–1942 for which he made a series of drawings of people sheltering in the London Underground, as well as studies of miners at the coal face. In these pictures he frequently used watercolour over wax crayon.

     

    After the war Moore enjoyed a great deal of success, with his works receiving critical acclaim all around the world. He executed many major commissions for museums, public institutions, private collectors and municipal buildings and as a result he became one of the most famous British artists of the twentieth century.

     

    At the beginning of the 1970s Moore created a foundation, the aim of which was to promote public awareness of sculpture and to protect his own work for the future. Located in his home village of Much Hadham, Hertfordshire, the foundation houses a library, archives and a collection of drawings, prints, maquettes and sculptures by the artist. Heavily influenced by the work of Michelangelo, Moore created monumental works in marble, stone and bronze and was enthralled by the theme of the family, and in particular the mother and child. His unique oeuvre draws inspiration from prehistoric, archaic, Egyptian, African, Mexican and Roman sculpture. Throughout his career he was noted for his output of graphic art – drawings, watercolours, etchings and lithographs which were not necessarily related to individual sculptures.

     

    [1] Ann Garrould (ed.), Henry Moore, Complete Drawings, 1940-1949, Vol. III, Lund Humphries, London, 2001, p.4

    [2] Kenneth Clark, Henry Moore, Drawings, Harper & Row, London, 1974, p.114

  • Henry Moore - Reclining Figure
    Henry Moore Reclining Figure Signed & numbered 5/9
    Bronze
    7 in
    17.8 cm
    Full details

    BM 163

     

    HENRY MOORE OM CH

     Castleford, Yorks 1898 - 1986 Much Hadham, Herts

     

    Reclining Figure

     

    Signed & numbered on the side of the base: Moore 5/9

    Bronze: 7 in / 17.8 cm length

    Conceived and cast in 1983 in a numbered edition of 9 plus one artist’s copy

    LH 905

     

    Provenance:

    James Kirkman, London

    Rex Irwin, Sydney, acquired from the above

    Private collection, Sydney, acquired from the above

    Private collection, Australia

    Sale, Christie’s London, 1st July 1999, lot 699

    Private collection, UK, purchased at the above sale

    Private collection, gifted from the above in 1999

     

    Exhibited:

    Sydney, Rex Irwin Art Dealer, Henry Moore: A Tribute, 1990, no. 12  

     

    Literature:

    John Hedgecoe, A Monumental Vision, The Sculpture of Henry Moore, Stewart Tabori & Chan, London, 1998, no. 768, another cast illustrated p. 250

    Alan Bowness (ed.), Henry Moore: Complete Sculpture 1980-86, Vol. 6, Lund Humphries, London, revised 1999, no. 905, another cast illustrated p. 60, pl. 131 & 132

     

     

    ‘From the very beginning the reclining figure has been my main theme. The first one I made was around 1924, and probably more than half of my sculptures since then have been reclining figures’ (the artist cited in J. Hedgecoe and H. Moore, Henry Spencer Moore, Simon and Schuster, New York, 1968, p. 151).

     

    Moore’s enthusiasm for the reclining figure continued amidst a sequence of new themes, allowing him to pursue unexpected formal possibilities: ‘I want to be quite free of having to find a ‘reason’ for doing the Reclining Figures, and freer still of having to find a ‘meaning’ for them. The vital thing for an artist is to have a subject that allows to try out all kinds of formal ideas – things that he doesn’t yet know about for certain but wants to experiment with, as Cézanne did in his ‘Bathers’ series. In my case the reclining figure provides chances of that sort. The subject-matter is given. It’s settled for you, and you know it and like it, so that within it, within the subject that you’ve done a dozen times before, you are free to invent a completely new form-idea’ (the artist cited in John Russell, Henry Moore, Allen Lane, The Penguin Press, London 1968, p.28).

     

     

    Henry Moore, Reclining Figure, 1983 (cast 0)

    The Henry Moore Foundation

     

     


    HENRY MOORE OM CH

    Castleford, Yorks 1898 - 1986 Much Hadham, Herts

     

    The seventh child of Raymond Spencer and Mary Moore, Henry was born in Castleford, Yorkshire in 1898. His paternal great-grandfather was of Irish origin, but his father and grandfather were born in Yorkshire where, for two or three generations, they worked the land or went down the mines. At the age of twelve Moore obtained a grant to study at the Grammar School in Castleford where he was inspired by his art teacher to pursue a career in the arts. In 1916 he began to teach, but by February 1917 he had joined the army and left to fight in France. After being wounded in action in November 1917 at the battle of Cambrai, Moore was excused from active service. He returned to England, where he became a physical education instructor in the army. At the end of the war, Moore received a veteran’s grant to study at Leeds School of Art and in 1921 he joined a course at the Royal College of Art in London. A further grant enabled him to travel extensively from 1925, visiting Rome, Florence, Venice, Ravenna and Paris, where he met Picasso, Giacometti, Ernst, Eluard and Breton among others.

     

    On returning from his travels Moore was appointed Professor of Sculpture at the Royal College of Art where he worked two days a week until 1931, as well as teaching at the Chelsea School of Art until 1939. He was appointed an Official War Artist during the Second World War from 1940–1942 for which he made a series of drawings of people sheltering in the London Underground, as well as studies of miners at the coal face. In these pictures he frequently used watercolour over wax crayon. After the war Moore enjoyed a great deal of success, with his works receiving critical acclaim all around the world. He executed many major commissions for museums, public institutions, private collectors and municipal buildings and as a result he became one of the most famous British artists of the twentieth century.

     

    At the beginning of the 1970s Moore created a foundation, the aim of which was to promote public awareness of sculpture and to protect his own work for the future. Located in his home village of Much Hadham, Hertfordshire, the foundation houses a library, archives and a collection of drawings, prints, maquettes and sculptures by the artist. Heavily influenced by the work of Michelangelo, Moore created monumental works in marble, stone and bronze and was enthralled by the theme of the family, and in particular the mother and child. His unique oeuvre draws inspiration from prehistoric, archaic, Egyptian, African, Mexican and Roman sculpture. Throughout his career he was noted for his output of graphic art – drawings, watercolours, etchings and lithographs which were not necessarily related to individual sculptures.

     

  • Henry Moore - Madonna and Child
    Henry Moore Madonna and Child Signed on the back: H Moore
    Bronze
    5 3/4 in
    14.6 cm
    Full details

     

    BM 79

     

    HENRY MOORE OM CH

    Castleford, Yorks 1898 - 1986 Much Hadham, Herts

     

    Madonna and Child

     

    Signed on the back: H MOORE

    Bronze with green and brown patina: 5 ¾ in / 14.6 cm height

    (excluding base)

    Wood base: 3 ⅝ x 3 ¼ x 1 ¾ in / 9.2 x 8.2 x 4.4 cm

    Conceived in terracotta in 1943 and cast in bronze in an unnumbered edition of 7

    LH 223

     

    Provenance:

    Jeffrey H. Loria & Co., Inc, New York, acquired from the artist

    Mr & Mrs Harry M. Goldblatt, May 1969, acquired from the above

     

    Literature:

    Robert Melville, Henry Moore, Sculpture and Drawings, 1921-1969, London, 1970, p. 351, no. 308 (another cast illustrated)

    David Mitchinson (ed.), Henry Moore Sculpture, With Comments by the Artist, London, 1981, p. 310, no. 158 (another cast illustrated p. 91)

    David Sylvester (ed.), Henry Moore, Complete Sculpture 1921-48, Vol. 1, Lund Humphries, London, 1988, p. 13, no. 223 (terracotta version illustrated p. 138)

     

     

    The present work was cast from a terracotta model made in 1943 for the Horton stone Madonna and Child at the Parish Church of St Matthew’s, Northampton, which Moore described as ‘one of the most difficult and heart searching sculptures that I ever tried to do’.[1] Having seen Moore’s Shelter Drawings, the Rev. Walter Hussey (later Dean of Chichester) commissioned the sculpture to commemorate the half-centenary of the church, giving the artist his first opportunity to carve in stone since the start of the war.[2] Despite the clear correspondence of the subject to his preoccupation with the Mother and Child theme, the gravity of the commission made Moore apprehensive and he insisted upon months of preparatory drawing and approximately twelve clay models before being satisfied that his idea could be realised.

     

    ‘I began thinking of the ‘Madonna and Child’ for St Matthew’s considering in what ways a ‘Madonna and Child’ differs from a carving of just a ‘Mother and Child’ – that is, by considering how in my opinion religious art differs from secular art. It’s not easy to describe in words what this difference is, except by saying in general terms that the ‘Madonna and Child’ should have an austerity and a nobility, and some touch of grandeur (even hieratic aloofness) which is missing in the everyday ‘Mother and Child’ idea. Of the sketches and models I have done, the one chosen has I think a quiet dignity and gentleness. I have tried to give a sense of complete easiness and repose, as though the Madonna could stay in that position for ever (as being in stone, she will have to do)’ (the artist cited in D. Sylvester (ed.), op cit., p. XXV).

     

     


    HENRY MOORE OM CH

    Castleford, Yorks 1898 - 1986 Much Hadham, Herts

     

    The seventh child of Raymond Spencer and Mary Moore, Henry was born in Castleford, Yorkshire in 1898. His paternal great-grandfather was of Irish origin, but his father and grandfather were born in Yorkshire where, for two or three generations, they worked the land or went down the mines. At the age of twelve Moore obtained a grant to study at the Grammar School in Castleford where he was inspired by his art teacher to pursue a career in the arts. In 1916 he began to teach, but by February 1917 he had joined the army and left to fight in France.

     

    After being wounded in action in November 1917 at the battle of Cambrai, Moore was excused from active service. He returned to England, where he became a physical education instructor in the army. At the end of the war, Moore received a veteran’s grant to study at Leeds School of Art and in 1921 he joined a course at the Royal College of Art in London. A further grant enabled him to travel extensively from 1925, visiting Rome, Florence, Venice, Ravenna and Paris, where he met Picasso, Giacometti, Ernst, Eluard and Breton among others.

     

    On returning from his travels Moore was appointed Professor of Sculpture at the Royal College of Art where he worked two days a week until 1931, as well as teaching at the Chelsea School of Art until 1939. He was appointed an Official War Artist during the Second World War from 1940–1942 for which he made a series of drawings of people sheltering in the London Underground, as well as studies of miners at the coal face. In these pictures he frequently used watercolour over wax crayon.

     

    After the war Moore enjoyed a great deal of success, with his works receiving critical acclaim all around the world. He executed many major commissions for museums, public institutions, private collectors and municipal buildings and as a result he became one of the most famous British artists of the twentieth century.

     

    At the beginning of the 1970s Moore created a foundation, the aim of which was to promote public awareness of sculpture and to protect his own work for the future. Located in his home village of Much Hadham, Hertfordshire, the foundation houses a library, archives and a collection of drawings, prints, maquettes and sculptures by the artist. Heavily influenced by the work of Michelangelo, Moore created monumental works in marble, stone and bronze and was enthralled by the theme of the family, and in particular the mother and child. His unique oeuvre draws inspiration from prehistoric, archaic, Egyptian, African, Mexican and Roman sculpture. Throughout his career he was noted for his output of graphic art – drawings, watercolours, etchings and lithographs which were not necessarily related to individual sculptures.

     

     

    [1] The artist cited in J. Hedgecoe and H. Moore, Henry Spencer Moore, Simon and Schuster, New York, 1968, p. 159.

    [2] He also commissioned Benjamin Britten to compose a cantata for the celebration.

The seventh child of Raymond Spencer Moore and Mary Moore, Henry Moore was born in Castleford, Yorkshire in 1898. His paternal great grandfather was of Irish origin but his father and grandfather were born in Yorkshire where, for two or three generations, they worked the land or went down the mines. At the age of twelve Moore obtained a grant to study at the Grammar School in Castleford where he was inspired by his art teacher to pursue a career in the arts. In 1916 he began to teach but by February 1917 he had joined the army and left to fight in France.


After being wounded in action in November 1917 at the battle of Cambrai, Moore was excused from active service. He returned to England where he became a physical education instructor in the army. At the end of the war he received a veteran's grant to study at the Leeds School of Art and in 1921 he joined a course at the Royal College of Art in London. A further grant enabled Henry Moore to travel extensively from 1925 and he visited Rome, Florence, Venice, Ravenna and Paris where he met Picasso, Giacometti, Ernst, Eluard and Breton.


On returning from his travels Henry Moore was appointed Professor of Sculpture at the Royal College of Art where he worked two days a week until 1931, also working at the Chelsea School of Art until 1939. Moore was appointed an official war artist for the Second World War from 1940-1942 and during this period he made a series of drawings of people sheltering in the London Underground, as sell as studies of miners at the coal face. In these pictures he frequently used watercolour over wax crayon.


After the war he enjoyed a great deal of success with his works receiving critical acclaim all around the world. Henry Moore executed many major commissions for Museums, Public Institutions, private collectors and municipal buildings and as a result he became one of the most famous British artists of the twentieth century.


At the beginning of the 1970s Henry Moore created a foundation, the aim of which was to promote public awareness in sculpture and protect his own work for the future. Located at Much Haddam, the village where the artist lived, the foundation houses a library, archives and a collection of drawings, prints, maquettes and sculptures by the artist.


Heavily influenced by the work of Michelangelo, Moore created monumental works in marble, stone and bronze and was enthralled by the theme of the family, and in particular the mother and child. Henry Moore’s unique oeuvre draws inspiration from prehistoric, archaic, Egyptian, African, Mexican and roman sculpture and throughout his career he was also noted for his output of graphic art - drawings, watercolours, etchings and lithographs which were not necessarily closely related to individual sculptures.


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