Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Nature morte aux pommes

Oil on canvas: 12.2(h) x 17.9(w) in /

12.2(h) x 17.9(w) cm

Signed upper right: Renoir .

Request price
Request viewing
Contact us
Share

Price request

We will only use your contact details to reply to your request.


protected by reCAPTCHA - PrivacyTerms

Close The Form

Request viewing

We will only use your contact details to reply to your request.


We will contact you shortly after receiving your request.

protected by reCAPTCHA - PrivacyTerms

Close the Form
Close the Form

Contact us


Telephone +44 (0)20 7493 3939

Email: paintings@richardgreen.com

We will only use your contact details to reply to your request.


protected by reCAPTCHA - PrivacyTerms

This framed painting is for sale.
Please contact us on:
+44 (0)20 7493 3939

 

BM 75

 

PIERRE-AUGUSTE RENOIR

Limoges 1841 – 1919 Cagnes

 

Nature morte aux pommes

Signed upper right: Renoir .

Oil on canvas:  12 ¼ x 17 ⅞ in / 31.1 x 45.4 cm

Frame size: 19 1/8 x 24 ½ in / 48.6 x 62.2 cm

 

Painted circa 1905

Provenance:

Galerie Ambroise Vollard, Paris, no.7350

Mouradian et Vallotton, Paris

Mrs Neville Bond, OBE;

her estate sale, Christie’s London, 24th June 1986, lot 115

Private collection, acquired at the above sale;

by descent

Richard Green Gallery, London, 2008

Private collection, Europe

 

Literature:

Guy-Patrice and Michel Dauberville, Renoir: Catalogue Raisonné des Tableaux, Pastels, Dessins et Aquarelles, vol. IV, 1903-1910, Paris 2012, p.76, no.2784, illus.

 

This painting will be included in the forthcoming Renoir catalogue critique being prepared by the Wildenstein Institute and established from the archive funds of François Daulte, Durand-Ruel, Venturi, Vollard and Wildenstein.

Unlike his contemporaries Manet, Monet and Sisley, Renoir did not paint still lifes until the latter part of his career. With his light, swift touch, Renoir took great pleasure in the sensuous qualities of oil paint and often considered still life painting to be a welcome break from his larger projects. From around 1880 he began to concentrate more on painting flowers, fruit and everyday objects. He found that these still lifes afforded him the opportunity to focus solely on colour and form, without the distraction of composition and perspective. Renoir advised Manet’s niece Julie to paint still life ‘in order to teach yourself to paint quickly’[1]; the numerous works, often elaborate and ambitious, which he executed in this genre attest to his sustained interest in still-life as an end in itself. Indeed it was in his still lifes that Renoir pursued some of his most searching investigations of the effects of light and colour on objects and surfaces. Renoir told his biographer, Albert André, that it was in his small-scale still-lifes that ‘he put the whole of himself, that he took every risk’[2]. Light

pervades Nature morte aux pommes, suffusing the scene with an atmospheric radiance. The rich red and yellow hues of the apples are highlighted with luminous areas of white, while the greens and yellows to the right suggest the vista of a garden. This painting, made circa 1905,   demonstrates how Renoir increasingly sought to reconcile the tenets of Impressionism with the structure and permanence of the classical tradition. The sophisticated light effects neither dissolve the contour of the objects nor mitigate their mass. Indeed the apples, plate and tabletop seem to gain in clarity from the light filtering across the canvas.

 

Renoir was always aware that his work formed part of a proud tradition of European painting. He was especially drawn to the French artists of the ancien régime, with their balance of painterliness and compositional control. Charles Sterling comments: ‘Nurtured on the traditions of eighteenth-century French painting, Renoir…carried on the serene simplicity of Chardin. Pale shadows, light as a breath of air, faintly ripple across the perishable jewel of a ripe fruit. Renoir reconciles extreme discretion with extreme richness, and his full-bodied density is made up, it would seem, of coloured air. This is a lyrical idiom hitherto unknown in still life, even in those of Chardin. Between these objects and us there floats a luminous haze through which we distinguish them, tenderly united in a subdued shimmer of light’[3].

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PIERRE-AUGUSTE RENOIR

Limoges 1841 – 1919 Cagnes

 

 

Pierre-August Renoir, one of the best loved of the Impressionists, always painted the beauties of nature: harmonious landscapes, flowers, fruit, children and women. He began his career at the age of thirteen as a painter on porcelain in a factory in Paris. He soon gave this up in favour of painting fans and decorating blinds, which he did until 1862, when he had saved enough money to support his ambition to study art. He enrolled in classes at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and in 1864 had his first painting accepted at the Paris Salon.

 

During this period Renoir also studied in the atelier of Charles Gleyre, where he became friends with Claude Monet, Alfred Sisley and Frédéric Bazille.  In 1863 Manet’s Déjeuner sur l’Herbe caused uproar at the Salon des Refusés and made a deep impression on the group of young painters. They began to go on expeditions to the Forest of Fontainebleau to paint en plein air and started to develop a palette and style of painting that formed the foundation of Impressionism. In 1869 Renoir worked alongside Claude Monet at La Grenouillière on the Seine, producing what are considered to be the first landscapes painted in the Impressionist style. 

 

Although Renoir continued to submit his works to the Salon throughout the early 1870s, he also continued to explore his new approach to light and colour and to forge strong links with other like-minded artists such as Camille Pissarro, Alfred Sisley and Edgar Degas. By 1874 the group was so disaffected by the constraints placed upon them by the Salon jury that they decided to mount their own exhibition which challenged the accepted tradition of official art exhibitions. In April 1874 the group held the first of the Impressionist exhibitions.

 

This group of artists exhibited eight times between 1874 and 1886 and Renoir participated on four occasions. In 1878 his painting Madame Charpentier and her children (Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York) was accepted at the Salon. The painting was critically well received and Renoir finally began to sell his paintings; for the first time he experienced a degree of financial security. As Renoir’s popularity grew he travelled more and gradually began to adopt a different approach to his art. The Impressionists were suffering from internal disputes which led Renoir to disassociate himself from them; consequently he did not take part in the eighth and final show in 1886.

 

Throughout the rest of his life Renoir’s work continued to develop. He visited the South of France, Italy and North Africa, where he painted dramatic, highly-coloured landscapes. He eventually married his mistress Aline Charigot and as his family grew he experienced a new contentment. In 1907, suffering from ill health, he purchased a property in Cagnes-sur-Mer near Nice on the Côte d’Azur where he settled with his family and painted until his death in 1919.  

[1] Quoted in Julie Manet, Journal, 1893 – 1899, Paris, p.190.

[2] Quoted in Albert André, Renoir, 1928, p.49.

[3] Still Life in Painting from Antiquity to the Present Time, Paris 1959, p.100.

ImpressionistPierre-Auguste Renoir