Pierre Eugene Montezin

Nymphéas

Oil on canvas: 23.7(h) x 28.9(w) in /

60.3(h) x 73.3(w) cm

Signed lower left: Pmontezin

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BS 158

 

PIERRE-EUGÈNE MONTÉZIN

Paris 1874 – 1946 Moelan

 

Nymphéas

 

Signed lower left: PMontezin

Oil on canvas: 23 ¾ x 28 ⅞ in / 60.3 x 73.3 cm

Frame size: 33 x 38 in / 83.8 x 96.5 cm

 

Painted circa 1925-30

 

Provenance:

M Blache;

his sale, Versailles, 4th December 1966, lot 50

Private collection, Paris

 

The authenticity of this work has been confirmed by Cyril Klein-Montézin, grandson of the artist: Certificate no.577

 

 

The son of a lace draftsman, Pierre-Eugène Montézin was introduced to the arts at a young age and was entered by his father into a decorative atelier to learn the art of executing murals.  In 1903 Montézin was introduced to the artist Quost, who encouraged him to concentrate on drawing and painting and to study the theories of Impressionism.  He abandoned his work as a collage artist and concentrated on landscapes applying the ideals of painting en plein-air.  He exhibited his first work at the Salon des Artistes Français in 1903.  Montézin was awarded medals in 1907 and 1910 and in 1920 he was awarded the Prix Rosa Bonheur.   He received the Légion d’Honneur in 1923 and succeeded Edouard Vuillard at the Académie des Beaux Arts in 1945.

Montézin was most strongly influenced by the work of Claude Monet, and after the First World War he spent a year in the countryside around Dreux and Moret following in the footsteps of Alfred Sisley.  He remained loyal to the principles of Impressionism throughout his career despite the emergence of the Cubist, Surrealist and Abstract art movements and, like Paul Cézanne before him he died whilst painting in the open air.

 

 

 

ImpressionistPierre Eugene Montezin