Bryan Ingham

Still life with blue jug and the Lizard landscape

Oil and collage on board: 17.5(h) x 27.2(w) in /

44.4(h) x 69.2(w) cm

Signed, dated 1986-89 and inscribed on backboard

Request price
Request viewing
Contact us
Share

Price request

Request viewing

We will contact you shortly after receiving your request.

Contact us


Telephone +44 (0)20 7493 3939

Email: paintings@richardgreen.com

This framed painting is for sale.
Please contact us on:
+44 (0)20 7493 3939

SP 5211

 

BRYAN INGHAM

Preston, Lancashire 1936 – 1997 Helston, Cornwall

 

Still life with blue jug and the Lizard landscape

 

Signed, dated and inscribed on the reverse: Bryan Ingham / 1986-89 / Still life with Blue Jug and The Lizard Landscape

Oil & collage on board: 17 ½ x 27 ¼ in /44.4 x 69.2 cm

Frame size: 28 ⅞ x 39 ¾ in / 73.3 x 101 cm

 

Provenance:

Francis Graham-Dixon Gallery, London

Private collection, UK

 

 

“To beg, borrow, consolidate and synthesise, to add, even, to the classical tradition of harmony and contained chance” – Bryan Ingham[1]

 

Bryan Ingham’s connection to St. Ives is inescapable. ‘He wrote once that he had always loved Englishness, bound in a nostalgic affection for familiar scenes and old ways … If the far-west of Cornwall may be called England, such sympathies perhaps were what drew him there, to that ancient industrial-rural world that was yet changing, certainly so in the 1960s, more slowly and reluctantly than elsewhere.’[2] After the Royal College of Art, where Ingham’s draughtsmanship, painting and etching skills had been both honed and appreciated, and after a year or so at the British school at Rome, it was safe to say that Cornwall claimed him. This remarkable landscape had such a forcible influence on the young artist when he moved there in mid-to-late sixties, that he actively rejected the life of an established artist and based himself on the remote Lizard peninsular in Cornwall, for the rest of his life.

 

The Lizard landscape for Ingham, in his own words was, “part chance, part choice … I found an old farmhouse by the sea, solid built with oil lamps at night and water from the well. I made a garden and grew lettuce and flowers. I shot rabbits and brewed good beer and wine.”[3] Ingham had found unspoiled rural bliss and his sense of belonging in Cornwall was enhanced further by the place he established for himself within the artists’ community, as he was an active member of the Penwith Society of Artists at St Ives. His engagement with modernist artists in the society, who had been working in St Ives from the early-1940s, is important when considering a work such as Still life with Blue Jug and the Lizard Landscape. Finding himself so closely entwined with this loose, productive community of artists, sharing with them the same interests in modernism at large and being stimulated by the same landscape; allowed Ingham to question his appreciation of it in his own work.

 

In Still life with Blue Jug and the Lizard Landscape elements of Cubist constructionism, a theme that would become more prominent in his later still life etchings, break the composition down into different, layered spaces. Ingham was equally committed to landscape and still life, increasingly creating a synthesis of both and in Still life with Blue Jug and the Lizard Landscape the turquoise and deep blues of the sea that surrounds Lizard Point highlights the abstracted lines of a recurring subject in Ingham’s Cornish-oeuvre, a cup. In the present work, layers upon layers of textures have been laid down – or in his words “quarried” (from the etching plate) – with the background, a distant landscape, brought forward on to the same picture plain as the misshapen object. An index page ripped out and pressed flat, etched circles and lines, earth-brown and umber shapes that appear rough in texture as though their colour has been applied through means other than brushstrokes, by scratching and scraping that creates a bobbled-effect on the board’s surface. The resulting collage is a masterpiece of ‘harmony and contained chance’ that conveys Cornish flavour and the visible influence of Ben Nicholson’s 1930s Cubist compositions and the Classical master, Pablo Picasso; openly acknowledged in a work that is unmistakably his own.

 

“We find out what we are through our art – it’s a long process. By nature I am I think a ‘classical’ artist i.e. chasing timeless values” – Ingham[4] 

 

 

 

.

BRYAN INGHAM

Preston, Lancashire 1936 – 1997 Helston, Cornwall

 

George Bryan Ingham was a painter, printmaker and sculptor born in Preston, Lancashire on 11th June 1936, the only child of George Ingham and his wife Alice, both involved in the clothing trade. He grew up in the Sheffield suburb of Totley, before the family moved near to Bradford. Ingham left grammar school at 15 and went into the family business, working in the tailoring department of a store in Sheffield for two years. After three years of National Service in the RAF from 1954-57, Bryan went to St Martin’s School of Art, London from 1957-61. Carel Weight perceived his talent and encouraged his move to the Royal College of Art for a Post-Graduate degree from 1961-64, where his contemporaries included David Hockney and Patrick Caulfield. He was voted a Royal Scholar in 1962.  After teaching for two years following graduation at Farnham Art College (and later at Falmouth Art School), Ingham spent a year in Italy including six months at the British Academy in Rome, with the help of the Leverhulme Research Award.

 

Following his return, Ingham moved to Jollytown in Cornwall, an isolated farmhouse overlooking Kynance Cove and the Lizard where he lived and worked for the next twenty-five years. During the winter, the artist would travel to the former artists’ colony Worpswede, north Germany where he first began to work with collage during the late 1980s. In 1989 Ingram married Aysel Ozakin, a Turkish writer and poet. The marriage was dissolved in 1994. While based in Cornwall and Germany, the artist travelled to Barcelona, Tuscany, Berlin, Paris and Malta: ‘A sense of place was always central to any understanding of Ingham’s art’ (Francis Graham-Dixon, The Independent, 30th September 1997).

 

According to the artist, his work was to “To beg, borrow, consolidate and synthesise, to add, even, to the classical tradition of harmony and contained chance” (The Artist in 1991, cited in The Independent, op.cit.).

[1] The artist cited in 1997, Francis Graham-Dixon, The Independent, 30th September 1997

[2] W. Packer, “Bryan Ingham by William Packer”, Bryan Ingham 1936-1997,  (London: The Fine Art Society, 2006)

[3] The artist cited in “Bryan Ingham by William Packer”, Bryan Ingham 1936-1997,  (London: The Fine Art Society, 2006)

[4] The artist cited in “Bryan Ingham by William Packer”, Bryan Ingham 1936-1997,  (London: The Fine Art Society, 2006)

Post War BritishBryan Ingham